Maringret’s Ruins – Loryma

 

Loryma was …

– what the research yielded about myPlace
– links to sites/databases for myPlace

Access to Site: the only options for Loryma are hiking in on the Carian Trail or by water
boats do make day-trips from Marmaris in season
Click here for local bus schedules in Muğla province.
References:
Ancient Locations database nothing
Carian Trail website click here
MegaLithic website nothing
Perseus database click here
Tay Project database click here
Vici website click here
Wikipedia click here

Loryma takes some beating when it comes to isolation. The only paths in are by hiking a remote section of the Carian Trail or by boat. The Carian Trail crosses the top of the bay and passes the remains of the Carian settlement, then carries on southwest down the coast. There is a side trail which leads to the citadel on top of the southwest entrance to the bay. For boats anchored at the top of the bay, this trail is the easiest route to the citadel. The path weaves along behind the 3 seaside restaurants with docks.

Having visited in the off-season, the restaurants were all closed up and goats were ranging around the bay. Along with the goats were dogs which presumably were to guard the goats. These dogs were not friendly and although we carried a “dog zapper” we retreated to the boat and returned later in the year when the tourist season has commenced. During the tourist season there was no sign of the dogs so presumably they are elsewhere in the summer.

Following the Carian Trail to the northeast (i.e. towards Marmaris) leads up a low pass, on the sides we saw two sites which were carved into the rock faces and appeared like they were devotional sites of some sort. They had the appearance of being fountains carved into the rock face but how the water would have been supplied is a complete mystery. There was one on either side of the valley the paths follows up.

There seems to be a telephone/internet repeater on the headland to the east of the bay. The site is visible when you sail into Loryma, antennas on towers and rows of solar panels. We guess that this boosts the signal from Marmaris or Fethiye across the water. Our experience is that it does not always work so perhaps it is shut down during the off-season.

Site Condition: 2 (out of 5)
Site Ambience: 4.5 (out of 5)
Site Access: see description below
Positional Accuracy: 4 (out of 5)
site rating definitions are here.

Spending a night at anchor in Loryma is a rather other-worldly experience as one thinks of who has stayed there in times gone by. As Freya Stark described it in her 1956 book “The Lycian Shore”:

In the stillness of Loryma we spent the night. The wind could be heard howling outside, against the hills that enclosed our sheltered water as if it were a mountain tarn. Only a fanning ripple touched the centre. The sound of the wind, inarticulate and busy like the world’s voice, gave an illusion of safety, of an unassailable peace. If it could penetrate, how many sleeping echoes would it waken? Athenians from Samos, dodging the Dorian Cnidus, picking up ship’s tackle at Syme, sheltering at Loryma; Conon, before the battle, with his ninety ships; the Roman fleet that dared not face Hannibal in the offing; Cassius, gathering forces against Rhodes, twenty miles away. Each in their turn passed through the narrow opening and felt the sudden calm. In these places, the natural features have remained unaltered; the moments that visit them, fashioned to one pattern by nature itself, drop like beads on a string, through long pauses, one after the other, into the same silence.

– 3 thumbnails of site (120 pix high)
pictures by XXX


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